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Is China Still a Developing Country?

Why Copenhagen May End with Beijing Looking Like the Conciliatory Party

By Ann Danylkiw

Dec 16, 2009

Earlier in the day, ministers of the four BASIC emerging market countries — Brazil, South Africa, India and China — made a coordinated statement of unity and commitment to the negotiating process. While there is little doubt that the BASICs are unified, China is the only one of the group able to fund it’s own green transition. And China’s ability to cooperate so far, while the U.S. can barely offer a domestic legislative climate change guarantee, shows that Vice Minister’s He’s promise to the Financial Times that “China will not be an obstacle” to a deal at Copenhagen may be credible.

 

See also:

China’s Entrepreneurs Are Ready, But Is Their Government?

China's Smart Grid Ambitions Could Open Door to US-China Cooperation

UN Climate Chief Praises China, Says US Must Deliver Concrete 2020 Target

China Sets 2020 Emissions Target in Interest of National Security

Evolution Solar: China Now 'Center of Gravity' for Solar Manufacturing

 

China will be a developed

China will be a developed country and superpower in 20 to 30 years

thank you

thank you

Todd Stern is ignorant

He only talks about the emission growth, but not the historical and current emission. The developed nations currently account for 90% of planet's green gas dump. The developed nations must have a big cut to make room for developing countries to dump. If he truly believes that 50 percent of the growth in emissions in the next 20 years will come from China (even if it is true, China emissions per capita is still less than half of US), the most effective and efficient way for developed nations is to help China to tackle the problem in a big way, rather than give some developing countries peanuts and deny China and other big developing countries any funding

Essentially will

Essentially will the US be borrowing (and paying interest on) money from the Chinese Government, only to donate it back to them??

Chinese Aid?

"China’s aid and investment activities in Africa alone totaled over $33 billion from 2002-2007."

Make no mistake, China's interest in Africa is for oil reserves, the Aid that they've given is in exchanged for leases and rights to oil from Nigeria to Liberia a simple google search will show you that.

Answer the real Question

The real Question is, will China be receiving funds from developed nations like the rest of the poor developing nations will?

Essentially will the US be borrowing (and paying interest on) money from the Chinese Government, only to donate it back to them?

When we ask if China is

When we ask if China is still a developing country, in this context at least, what we mean is: to what extent should China be bound by the rules proposed for wealthy nations and to what extent by those for poorer ones. One thing to remember is that the rules we are talking about aren't for the past but for the future--for many decades in the future. And this makes the case for China to claim impoverished status even more absurd than it would otherwise be. While China's per capita income level is currently low, it certainly won't be in a decade's time and even less in two decade's time. Couple this with the massive foreign currency reserves China already holds, and this makes any claim of China needing help pretty ridiculous. In fact, I think a good case could be made for China, already the world's largest CO2 polluter, to start funding the greening of truly poor nations.

Re: But what else?

The real Question is, will China be receiving funds from developed nations like the rest of the poor developing nations will?

Essentially will the US be borrowing (and paying interest on) money from the Chinese Government, only to donate it back to them?

China Strategy

Good.... U have a pretty blog ! Is Wen preponing Copenhagen visit to counter Browns'
$ 100 Bn bait to kill Kyoto ?

China is a developing country

Is China Still a Developing Country?

The answer is an obvious yes in all measures. China's GDP per capita was about $3,000, not only lower than that of the United States ($45,000), but also lower than Brazil ($10,000) and South Africa ($5,000). China also has 150 million people below the poverty line by the UN definition, equivalent to half of US population. China greenhouse gas emissions per capita is less than a quarter of US. where is the conclusion "China is the only one of the group able to fund it’s own green transition." coming from? Is that because China has taken proactive measures to allocate a large fund to solve the issue? That is not fair at all.

Given the above facts, China is already already doing a big favor to the world by pledging 40-45% reduction in the emission growth rate.

Todd Stern is ignorant. He only talks about the emission growth, but not the historical and current emission. The developed nations currently account for 90% of planet's green gas dump. The developed nations must have a big cut to make room for developing countries to dump. If he truly believes that 50 percent of the growth in emissions in the next 20 years will come from China (even if it is true, China emissions per capita is still less than half of US), the most effective and efficient way for developed nations is to help China to tackle the problem in a big way, rather than give some developing countries peanuts and deny China and other big developing countries any funding.

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